You Sinned against me. God’s Wrath. Abrahamic religions vs. Eastern ways

Aghora
8 min readJun 21, 2023
Divine Punishment, abstract art, by Aghora (midjourney)

We will divide into two systems: Abrahamic and Eastern

In Abrahamic regions: 1. Divine PUNISHMENT exits, mostly from disobeying God’s will, commandments, or path. 2. In the afterlife, Hell or Heaven are eternal. 3. God personally punishes an individual.

In eastern systems: 1. There is NO DIVINE punishment, but punishment or reward from your own actions. 2. In the afterlife, Both Hell and Heaven are NOT eternal. 3. God does not personally punish individuals.

Note: It’s important to note that interpretations of these concepts can vary widely among different religions, different sects, different denominations, and individual believers.

With that in mind, let’s look at each individual religion.

In Judaism, the concept of divine punishment is complex and multifaceted, and it can vary significantly among different Jewish traditions and interpretations. Here are some general concepts:

  1. Punishment in This Life: The Torah is full of tales of how God punished people and entire communities for their sins. This includes the story of the Great Flood in Genesis, in which humanity is punished for its wickedness, and the story of the Israelites wandering in the desert for 40 years due to their lack of faith.
  2. Karet (Excision): In the Torah, certain sins are said to be punished by karet, which is often translated as “excision” or “cutting off.” The exact meaning of karet is debated, but it is generally understood to mean premature death or being cut off from the community or from the world to come.
  3. Divine Retribution: Some Jewish traditions believe in the concept of divine retribution, in which God punishes individuals for their sins. This is often seen as a form of divine justice.
  4. Suffering as a Test: Some Jewish thinkers interpret suffering not as a punishment but as a test or challenge from God. In this view, suffering is a way for individuals to demonstrate their faith and resilience.
  5. Repentance (Teshuvah): Judaism places a strong emphasis on the power of repentance to atone for sins. During the High Holidays (Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur), Jews engage in prayer, fasting, and acts of charity as a way to seek forgiveness from God.
  6. Afterlife: While Judaism does not have a single, unified concept of the afterlife, some Jewish traditions include the idea of Gehinnom (often translated as “Hell”), a place of purification or punishment for the wicked. However, Gehinnom is generally not seen as eternal, and most souls are believed to eventually reach Olam Ha-Ba (the world to come).

In Christianity, the concept of divine punishment for disobedience is primarily associated with the idea of sin and its consequences. Here are some key concepts:

  1. Sin and Separation from God: In Christian theology, sin is seen as a transgression against God’s law and results in separation from God. This separation is often described as spiritual death.
  2. Hell: Traditional Christian belief holds that unrepentant sinners will be eternally separated from God in Hell after death. Hell is often described as a place of torment and suffering.
  3. Judgment: Christianity teaches that all individuals will face a final judgment. Those who have accepted Christ and sought forgiveness for their sins will enter heaven, while those who have not will be separated from God.
  4. Temporal Consequences: Many Christians believe that sin can have temporal consequences in this life as well. This can include personal suffering, broken relationships, and other forms of hardship.
  5. Grace and Forgiveness: Central to Christian belief is the idea that, through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, individuals can be forgiven for their sins if they repent and accept Christ as their savior. This is seen as an act of God’s grace, or unmerited favor.
  6. Discipline: Some passages in the New Testament suggest that God disciplines those he loves (Hebrews 12:6), which some Christians interpret as meaning that hardships and trials in this life can serve as a form of divine correction or refinement. It’s important to note that interpretations of these concepts can vary widely among different Christian denominations and individual believers.

In Islam, the concept of divine punishment for disobedience is associated with the idea of sin and its consequences. Here are some key concepts:

  1. Sin and Separation from God’s Mercy: In Islamic theology, sin is seen as a transgression against God’s commands and can result in being distanced from God’s mercy. However, God is also described as being "most merciful" and "oft-forgiving.
  2. Hell (Jahannam): Traditional Islamic belief holds that unrepentant sinners will be punished in Hell (Jahannam) after death. Hell is described in the Quran as a place of torment and suffering.
  3. Day of Judgment: Islam teaches that all individuals will face a final Day of Judgment. On this day, deeds will be weighed, and based on their actions, individuals will either enter Paradise (Jannah) or Hell (Jahannam).
  4. Temporal Punishments: Some sins in Islam have specified temporal punishments, known as “Hudud” punishments. These are outlined in Islamic law (Sharia) and include penalties for crimes like theft and adultery. However, these punishments are subject to strict conditions and are implemented in very few Muslim-majority countries.
  5. Repentance (Tawbah): Central to Islamic belief is the idea that individuals can be forgiven for their sins if they sincerely repent and seek God’s forgiveness. The Quran frequently emphasizes God’s mercy and willingness to forgive.
  6. Trials and tribulations: Muslims view some hardships and trials in life as a form of divine test rather than punishment. These trials are seen as opportunities to demonstrate patience and faith.

In Hinduism, the concept of divine punishment is not as straightforward as in some other religions. Hinduism does not typically emphasize a punitive God who directly punishes individuals for their sins. Instead, the consequences of one’s actions are governed by the law of karma. Here are some key concepts:

  1. Karma: Karma is a fundamental concept in Hinduism. It refers to the law of cause and effect, where every action has consequences. If a person performs good actions, they will receive good consequences, and if they perform bad actions, they will receive bad consequences. These consequences may not be immediate and can carry over into future lives. 2. Reincarnation: Hinduism believes in the cycle of birth, death, and rebirth. The actions (karma) of a person in their current life will determine the circumstances of their next life. If a person lives a life of righteousness, they will be reborn into a better situation. Conversely, if they live a life of sin, they may be reborn into a lower caste or as a lower life form.
  2. Dharma: Dharma refers to the moral and ethical duties and responsibilities that individuals must follow in their lives. Failure to live according to one’s dharma can result in negative karma.
  3. Moksha: The ultimate goal in Hinduism is to achieve Moksha, or liberation from the cycle of birth and death. Only by upholding one's dharma and leading a life of righteousness is this possible.
  4. Hellish Realms: Some Hindu texts, like the Puranas, describe various hellish realms where a soul may go after death due to their negative karma. However, unlike in some religions, these hells are not eternal; the soul stays there until the negative karma is exhausted, then it is reborn on earth.
  5. Divine Intervention: Some Hindu traditions believe that gods may intervene in human affairs and can bestow blessings or inflict punishments. However, this is generally less emphasized than the concepts of karma and dharma.

In all of the Eastern systems, the concepts of Karma, Rebirth (samsara), and nirvana (liberation) are similar to Hindu thought and therefore omitted. Only those that each system specifically addresses are given below.

In Buddhism, the concept of divine punishment is not present as it is in many theistic religions because Buddhism does not posit a creator god who rewards or punishes. However, actions (karma) have consequences, and negative actions can lead to suffering. Here are some key concepts:

  1. Dukkha (suffering): Negative actions often lead to suffering in this life and future lives. This suffering is not seen as a punishment from a divine being but as a natural consequence of harmful actions.
  2. The Five Precepts: The Five Precepts are basic ethical guidelines that Buddhists are encouraged to follow. Violating these precepts can lead to negative karma and suffering.

In Jainism, the concept of divine punishment is not present as it is in many theistic religions because Jainism does not posit a creator god who rewards or punishes. However, actions (karma) have consequences, and negative actions can lead to suffering. Here are some key concepts:

  1. Non-violence (Ahimsa): Non-violence is a fundamental principle in Jainism. Violating this principle by causing harm to any living being can lead to the accumulation of harmful karma.
  2. The Five Vows: Jains are encouraged to follow the Five Great Vows, which include non-violence, truthfulness, non-stealing, chastity, and non-attachment. Violating these vows can lead to negative karma and suffering.

Taoism, also known as Daoism, is a philosophical and religious tradition from China that emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao (also spelled Dao), which can be roughly translated as “the way” or the fundamental nature of the universe. Taoism does not have the concept of a punitive God who rewards or punishes individuals for their actions. Instead, it teaches that actions have natural consequences. Here are some key concepts:

  1. Natural Consequences: Taoism teaches that actions in harmony with the Tao lead to peace and wellbeing, while actions that go against the Tao lead to disharmony and suffering. This is not seen as a punishment from a divine being but as a natural outcome of one’s actions.
  2. Health and Longevity: In Taoism, living in harmony with the Tao is associated with health and longevity, while living against the Tao can lead to illness and premature death. Some Taoist practices, such as Tai Chi and Qigong, are aimed at promoting health and longevity.
  3. Immortality: Some Taoist traditions focus on practices aimed at achieving physical immortality, though this is often understood metaphorically as living a long, healthy, and harmonious life. Actions that go against the Tao are seen as obstacles to achieving this goal.

In conclusion, a key distinction between Abrahamic religions (such as Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) and Eastern religions (such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Taoism) lies in their conceptualizations of divine punishment and consequences for disobedience. Abrahamic religions often emphasize a punitive God who directly administers punishments for sins; Eastern religions, do not have a punitive God.

Abrahamic religions tend to view disobedience to divine commands as leading to immediate and severe punishments, either in the present world or in the afterlife. The focus is on sin and repentance, with an emphasis on seeking forgiveness from God to avoid eternal damnation or separation. The concept of divine judgment and the existence of heaven and hell play significant roles in these religions.

Eastern religions often consider divine punishment an inherent consequence of one’s actions, governed by the law of cause and effect. The focus is on personal responsibility, individual growth, and the pursuit of enlightenment or self-realization. While some Eastern religious texts mention temporary hellish realms or the intervention of deities, these aspects are generally less emphasized compared to the concepts of karma and dharma.

It is important to note that these distinctions are generalized and do not capture the diverse interpretations and practices within each religious tradition. Variations exist within and across different denominations, sects, and individual beliefs. Overall, the contrast in the understanding of divine punishment and consequences between Abrahamic and Eastern religions reflects their differing theological frameworks, ethical perspectives, and approaches to spiritual growth.

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Aghora

Ekum Sat There is only one truth. This is the sum and total of Eastern thought, Santana Dharma.